Coming Alive and Fostering Hope

 

Submitted by Board Member, the Rev. Tanya Trzeciak

Don’t ask yourself what the world needs;
ask yourself what makes you come alive.
And then go and do that.
Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.

~Harold Whitman

I came across this saying while searching for something entirely different.  Coincidence?  Like my favorite television character always tells his team, I don’t believe in coincidences.

I don’t think we have to ask ourselves what the world, our country, or our neighborhood needs.  We already have a good idea.  The question should be ”what are we going to do about it?” We just celebrated the official beginning of spring and along with that occasion our thoughts turned to warmer days, trees bursting into flower and leaf, flowers pushing up through the brown earth and more birds singing outside our windows.  With spring always comes the promise of beauty and peace…hope of better things to come.

The political climate doesn’t look as if there is a bright, beautiful future for many of country but we have to foster hope.  Hope that we can stay alive and become more observant and involved in what is happening around us.  As pagans we believe in cycles…the Wheel of the Year, the cycles of life, death and life and the cycle of darkness and light.  We may be in the winter of despair but like the coming of spring after the darkness of winter, there is hope and light.  We must keep the light alive.  We must come alive and resist the darkness. What makes you come alive? What gives you hope?

Being Pagan Has Never Been Easy

wheeloftheyear

Contributed by the Rev. Tanya Trzeciak

Being a Pagan is not nor has it ever been easy.  For a large part of my life I had to stay in the “broom closet” with employers, many friends, and neighbors.  I had to hide the fact that I did not believe in one god almighty who was cruel and punishing. I was a solitary practitioner and did not seek out others for fear of being ostracized or,worse, fired from my job.

When I finally came out of the closet, some friends shied away out of fear while others asked questions.  The questioners embraced my strength to honor my beliefs while the others feared that I might be evil.  These people did not want any explanations or want to understand why I believe what I do.

However, I am a white female and I could hide who and what I was quite easily.  I didn’t have to wear a pentacle or goddess pendant in public.  I didn’t have to do or say anything to profess being a pagan.  I could practice what I believed in private and continue a public persona that didn’t upset the status quo.

My friends of color are not so lucky.  How do they hide the color of their skin? How do those who have to wear head scarves hide who they are?  How do they let others know that they are not bad people?

Society is so quick to judge a book by its cover and will not listen to explanations or even take the time to understand anyone who is even the slightest bit different.  We are all living beings and it is because of our differences that the world is such an awesome place.  Do we really want to be just another brick in the wall?